As heard on the Good Stuff with Jim Thompson

 

I used to stop and see the old man

Once or twice every week

I would help him with his chores

Feed his horse or fix a leak

 

He would invite me in for coffee

A coal black witch’s brew

I’d do my best to choke it down

And I’d always say thank you

 

His saddle was always oiled

And I really thought it odd

That the horse he kept outside

Was always freshly shod

 

And he’d say

 

“I think I’ll go for a ride

Today or maybe tomorrow

Would you like to come along

Do you need a horse to borrow”

 

But I knew he couldn’t ride

The old man could barely walk

But he’d mention it again

The next time that we talked

 

He told stories ‘bout the old days

And the men he used to know

All the good times that he had

With an old pard he called Joe

 

Sometimes he’d get confused

Like forgotten words to a song

And he’d mistake me for his old pard

But I always played along

 

And he’d say

 

“I think I’ll go for a ride

Today or maybe tomorrow

Would you like to come along

Do you need a horse to borrow”

 

 

He used to be a rodeo cowboy

He had a shoe box full of buckles

He displayed his age like the rings of tree

With his scarred and knobby knuckles

 

He had a tattoo on his arm

Said he got it in the Corps

And his eyes grew dark as night

When he talked about that war

 

And he’d say

 

“I think I’ll go for a ride

Today or maybe tomorrow

Would you like to come along

Do you need a horse to borrow”

 

The years went by as they seem to do

And I up and moved away

Then I got a call one night

Said the old man died today

 

And as I thought about the old man

A tear rolled down my face

But I caught it with a smile

When I realized God’s grace

 

The old man had been restored

I could almost sense his joy

As he gazed upon heaven’s herd

Like a child trying to pick a toy

 

And Jesus would say

 

“Would you like to go for ride

Today or maybe tomorrow

I’m sure Joe will come along

Do you need a horse to borrow”

 

Copyright © 2011 Cade Schalla

By

Cade Schalla