Whether is dark or light, day or night, cowboys have an unerring sense of
direction. 

Seldom will you find them walking but their inner GPS serves them well as
they navigate by horse or by pickup.

 

Not long ago, a cowboy was set to go to a roping in a town about 400 miles
from home. He called a friend in that same town to get directions to the
arena. 

 

"No problem," was the response, "You just take one of them roads just
outside of town, go down couple miles, and it's right there. You cain't miss
it."

 

There is no telling how many miles, for decades, have been traveled on that
very same reliable information. The topography of the land is always figured
into the information given and is clearly thought to be helpful.

 

In the flatland farm country where there are miles and miles of wheat, the
driving instruction will almost always include: "You just go down to that
wheat field, turn west, and it's right there. You cain't miss it."

 

In that same part of the world, directions could include "You go down past
the elevator, down to where that feller was changing a tire last time I was
down that way, and take a hard left. You cain't miss it."

 

Rodeo cowboys are no exception to this phenomenon. One set of ropers had a
plan to go to the million-dollar roping in Las Vegas. Their directions were
to head to El Paso and take a right, with the guarantee they couldn't miss
Las Vegas.

 

Another likely pair went to a roping down the road a ways. They had gotten
safely to the correct town but had no clue as to the whereabouts of the
arena. They, collectively, as it took both of them to form a reasonably
intelligent thought, hit on the idea of just finding a pickup and horse
trailer on the move and follow that rig to the arena. 

 

It wasn't long until a suspiciously authentic looking rig with just the
right specifications came by. The semi-lost duo pulled out from the local
Dairy Queen parking lot and fell in behind the authentic looking cowboy rig.


 

The targeted rig stopped at the Quik Stop, stopped at the tire store,
stopped at the feed store, the bank, the Co-op, and then finally headed out
of town. The trailing ropers were quite relieved because it was nearing time
for the roping to start. They followed him along until he pulled off the
highway and up to a ranch gate.

 

When they walked up to his truck and asked him if he was headed to the
roping, the man advised them he had just taken his horse to the vet and was
now on his way home. 

 

However, he did give them directions to the arena. "You just go on back up
this here road a ways, take that left by that big oak tree and go on down a
couple miles. You cain't miss it."

 

Do you think the fellas at NASA in Houston told the astronauts something
similar?

 

"You just strap this rocket to the backside of your spacecraft, and just
point that sucker toward Mars. It's right up there a ways. You cain't miss
it."

 

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